The New Rules On Racism?

Apparently, liberals have a little trouble with looking words up in the dictionary. If they would look up the word, marriage, for instance, they would see that it is defined as being something between a man and a woman. Seems simple enough, but liberals seem to thrive on bashing Christians. They insist the word must be bent to their unyielding will to include arbitrary arrangements of sexes that frankly won’t stand up in Darwin’s Theory of Evolution as far as successful strategies for survival of the species.

The word racism, to them, apparently, should be modified to mean only when whites do it. When anyone else does it, they would like it to be called advocacy.

Here’s the compact Oxford definition of the word racism:

racism
• noun 1 the belief that there are characteristics, abilities, or qualities specific to each race. 2 discrimination against or antagonism towards other races.

On my previous post, a comment was made that I don’t know anything about what I’m talking about when I claim that someone made a racist statement by saying the decisions of one race are superior in quality to those of another’s.

The fact that it was a careless, poorly worded statement does not lessen its inherent racism.

I always try to treat people fairly regardless of race, gender, or social standing. Is it so much to ask that I be extended the same courtesy?

I have strong feelings regarding racism. I ask you to think why that would be before accusing me of not knowing what I’m talking about.

Politics of Fear

You will criticise Judge Sotomayor at your own peril, says the White House. The City of New Haven threw out the test results and didn’t promote anyone for fear of a lawsuit, we hear.

The White House has proven that it will use its power to crush any who stand in its way, and the liberal media will dance like a puppet on a string to do its bidding. Character assassinations of beauty pageant contestants and old white guys seems to be the media’s specialty.

So, yes, indeed, let’s ask questions about this woman who went to private schools in her rag to riches story, who claims that the richness of her experience as a New York latina has made her a better decision maker than a white guy, regardless of his background. It’s her experience versus his skin color and Y chromosome that she claims makes the difference.

I don’t doubt that any man or woman of any race could perform about equally in any given position. I also acknowledge that men and women, in particular, are different. Women appear to be better than men at networking, for instance. But if I’m supposed to believe all of this Equal Opportunity Employer hoohah, that should not preclude a man from equal consideration for a job that requires extensive networking skill, should it?

We’ve had decades of affirmative action, “minorities and women given special consideration” on help wanted ads, and countless taxpayer funded special interest advocacy groups to try to level the playing field. White men have been left out of this system, other than to pay the taxes to fund the special interest advocacy groups, and provide jobs with a special consideration for members of these groups.

Do I have to say it again? I think that any man or woman of any race could perform just about any given job equally. But politically, there’s the added threat of a lawsuit from special interests. Some wield this fear as a political weapon, knowing they have powerful advocacy groups to back them up. In this way, minorities and women have both a system of protection if they are mistreated, and a political tool that white men don’t have.

In other words, the system does not provide equal protection for white men, and so political hacks like those currently occupying the white house can wield the powerful fear of self-interest groups against them.

Fear this.

She Almost Made The Right Point

I have no doubt Satomayor is a decent Latina woman with many honourable accomplishments. I also think she probably catered her lecture to La Raza, in speaking up for the voice of minority representation. But she used poor judgement in stating that because of her gender and race, she was more qualified, better, even, than someone of a different race and gender. And poor judgement isn’t exactly a desirable trait people look for in Supreme Court Judges, that I’m aware of.

That her nomination is a calculated decision by the Democratic Party is obvious. They want the Latino votes. Bill Richardson, (who once stated that he wanted Gonzales to be found innocent “because he’s hispanic”), withdrew his nomination to Commerce secretary under the stain of a corruption investigation. But Republicans catered to the Latin community as well, turning a blind eye to the burgeoning illegal immigrant community winning the Latino vote for George W. Bush.

I have no doubt, that even without the million plus dollars the Democratic Party will spend on advertising for Sotomayor’s nomination campaign, she will most likely be confirmed.

The fact is, she is largely being selected for the job for two reasons; the hoped for political clout of her minority status and because she will interpret the law with a liberal bias.

But in her statement to La Raza, in which she said a latina woman would come to a better decision than a white man based on her experience, she almost got it right. White men have been taught for the last four decades to be empathetic to the sensitivities of women and minorities. A white man would be far less likely to say they are better than someone else because of their race or gender. Most white men, I think, know better.

Disappointed in Myself

I used to go watch concerts at The Ritz in Rosedale, and remember walking in one night when a guy with a wad of cash in his hand outside the door said, “Ten Bucks for parking”. I barely slowed down, but remember being kinda pissed. The Ritz parking lot was in a strip mall, the guy was ripping people off.

I was reminded of this the other day, when I was parking downtown in Miami. It was an automated lot, there was a sign saying “No Parking Attendant on Duty”, but there was a guy, waving me up, telling me the prices with a fist full of parking tags in his hand. So I roll down the window and ask him about prices, when he thought I was going to pay, he stuck a parking tag on my dashboard. I grabbed it, and looked, sure enough, the tag was four days old. So, I parked the car, and started walking to the automated machine.

An older guy pulled up to the fake parking lot attendant, and the thought crossed my mind to warn him, but I just kept walking. I paid the tab, and as I walked back to put the parking tag on the dashboard, I saw the older guy standing in the parking lot, obviously becoming aware of the scam. As I walked back across the street, I saw him yelling at a cop, “I’ll have him arrested”.

It’s not the first time in my life that I regret not doing the right thing, but it strikes that it would’ve taken so little effort to have helped my fellow man, and I failed. I’m disappointed in myself.