Haiti, we need a working incident command structure.

I’ve read that 82nd circled PaP for 5 hours before being diverted to DR. I’ve read that Docs w/o borders were delayed. I’ve read that Drs have left post-op patients due to security concerns.

While we need to respect the local authority and give them at least a figurehead position, it’s clear that we need to get in there, and get in there fast. Proper political posturing needs to take a back seat to accomplishing the tasks at hand.

Our forest service has an Incident Command Structure that is a tried and true system for large scale operations. The benefits are that local control is maintained, they are local-friendly, accustomed to long-term, non-permanent operations, and let’s face it, lower cost than anything a FEMA or DHS type operation could possibly employ. They are experienced at adapting to rapidly-changing ground conditions.

It may not be feasible, but it beats reading the foreign press complain about doctors not being able to get in, and then abandoning their post due to lack of security that was delayed so the doctors could get there first.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/jan/18/haiti-aid-distribution-confusion-warning